1. Lack of on-going support from management.
  2. Failure to set forth an e-learning strategy that takes into account the most pressing business needs.
  3. Failure to create an organizational context for producing e-learning learning.
  4. Failure to recognize that e-learning, like most other Web-based initiatives, will require adaptive, incremental processes.
  5. Failure to perform meaningful reviews of e-learning development at the end of each project to assure continuous process improvement for subsequent e-learning projects.
  6. Failure to view e-learning modules as dynamic entities that will require on-going maintenance to stay current.
  7. Failure to manage risks.
  8. Creating e-learning courses that merely imitate (often poorly) traditional classroom offerings.
  9. Failure to distinguish between technology dazzle and real learning value.
  10. Failure to build modularity and reusability into e-learning courses.
  11. Failure to establish a change management strategy.
  12. Failure to keep all customers/stake holders involved and aligned with the e-learning goals of the organization.
  13. Failure to dedicate full-time support to the e-learning initiative.
  14. Failure to plan for the physical architecture required to support E-learning.
  15. Being “held hostage” by multimedia stars. Letting right-brained creativity on the part of the designers so completely dominate the project that schedules slip and standardization is not possible.
  16. Failure to recognize that e-learning, like most other Web-based initiatives, requires adaptive, incremental processes
  17. Failure to create an organizational context with clearly delineated roles and responsibilities for the e-learning development team and the other stakeholders in the e-learning project
  18. Failure to set forth an e-learning strategy that takes into account the most pressing business needs of your organization